Internet Glasses and Intelligent Internet Assistants in the Post-PC Era

 

The strategic innovation framework presented previously under the section entitled Steve Jobs shall be rigorously applied to Internet glasses, or inocles, and the resulting diagrams and conclusions shall be presented on this page soon. The most significant and valuable diagrams to the aforementioned stakeholders shall be the individual temporal slices of the multidimensional strategic product roadmap for inocles from the year 2013 onward.

 

The application of the strategic innovation framework to inocles shall also consider the importance of Inocle assistants, or Ino assistants, to the overall success and social acceptance of inocle technology. As proposed in our unique post-PC vision for inocles and inocle technology, an Ino assistant, or Ino for short, is defined as a voice-controlled personal intelligent agent and represents the voice interface for a pair of inocles, enabling an inocled user to control their inocle experience hands-free by issuing simple voice commands directly to their assistant.

 

For example, consider the case where a user owns a pair of pink stealth inocles configured with a single display (single lamp or single glass) and a single embedded Ino assistant. To wake the resident Ino assistant, the inocled user simply vocalizes "Hello Ino". Next, if the user would like to play music from a desired artist, say U2 for example, they simply vocalize the phrase "Ino music by U2". The Ino assistant responds immediately and plays music by U2 in shuffle mode from the user's personal music collection. For additional Ino voice-control examples, see Ino voice commands or Ino voice commands for media control.

In order to improve social acceptance of inocle technology and accelerate overall adoption rates across multiple dimensions, including gender, age, occupation, income, nationality, and ethnicity, the inocle voice interface, as represented by one or more embedded Ino assistants, is personalizable.

Ino personalization allows each user to tailor their inocle experience to match their individual personality, image, and style. For example, a user who owns a pair of fire-yellow stealth inocles may wish to replace the standard Ino Red assistant with a personalized Ino assistant, such as Ino Fox, Ino Pink Fox, or Ino Gold Fox.  For additional Ino personalization examples, see personalized icons of Inos modeling inocles, or Internet glasses.

 

Strategic Positioning Framework for the Post-PC Era

 

Before we begin to apply the Strategic Innovation Framework to generate the Multidimensional Strategic Product Roadmap for Inocle Internet glasses (conceptually equivalent to prospective Apple iGlasses), we must first understand the strategic relationships between wearable post-PC Internet glasses and other non-wearable post-PC devices, as well as all non-wearable PC devices. The optimal manner in which to understand these strategic relationships is to visualize them in the overall context of the continuum of wearable mobile, non-wearable mobile, and non-mobile devices. Moreover, by augmenting this continuum with the additional strategic dimension of computing era, we are able to construct a new visual paradigm for thinking about and describing the post-PC era. This new model for analyzing the true nature of the post-PC era is visually represented by the Multidimensional Strategic Positioning Framework for the Post-PC Era as presented below.

The strategic positioning framework contains four fundamental quadrants. The upper left quadrant represents post-PC era mobile devices, including wearables (such as Internet bands, Internet watches, and Internet glasses), portable music players (such as Apple iPods), smartphones (such as Apple iPhones), and tablets (such as Apple iPads). The lower left quadrant represented PC era mobile devices, including PC netbooks, PC laptops (such as Apple MacBook Pro), and PC Ultrabooks (such as Apple MacBook Air).

The lower right quadrant represents PC era non-mobile devices, including PC consumer and business desktops (such as the Apple iMac) and PC workstations (such as the Apple Mac Pro). The upper right quadrant represents post-PC era non-mobile devices, including smart televisions, high-definition smart TVs (such as the prospective Apple iTV HD), Ultra high-definition smart TVs (such as the prospective Apple iTV UHD), and extreme definition smart TVs. (Note: Apple products have been cited as parenthetical examples for each quadrant described above; however, equivalent competitive products from Samsung, Google, Microsoft, HP, Lenovo, Acer, Dell, Sony, or Amazon may be substituted for their corresponding Apple counterparts.)

Visual Definition of a Post-PC Device

The multidimensional strategic positioning framework presented above is particularly useful for answering a fundamental question raised by users all over the world:

 

  • "What is a post-PC device?"

 

To answer this key question, we must clearly define the true essence of a post-PC device. To assist in the definition process, we shall utilize the strategic positioning framework as our foundation and augment its dimensionality by introducing five new strategic dimensions:

 

  1. The dimension of Control
  2. The dimension of Complexity
  3. The dimension of Power
  4. The dimension of Price
  5. The dimension of Competency


The control dimension is defined as the primary user input control paradigm for a post-PC or PC device; the complexity dimension is defined as the degree difficulty in using a post-PC of PC device; the power dimension is defined as the amount of energy consumed by the post-PC or PC device; the dimension of price is defined as the retail price paid for a post-PC or PC device; and the dimension of competency is defined as the central purpose of the post-PC or PC device. By introducing these additional strategic dimensions, we arrive at three new variants of the strategic positioning framework, as depicted, defined, and described below, that taken together collectively enable us to construct a compelling visual definition of a post-PC device.

PC and Post-PC Control Paradigms

The first variant represents the primary user input control paradigms for devices from the PC era and the post-PC and is presented below.

This diagram is referred to as the Multidimensional Control Diagram for the Post-PC Era. The control diagram contains four quadrants. Each quadrant depicts the primary user input control paradigm for the class of devices represented within the quadrant. The upper left quadrant shows that the primary input control paradigm for mobile post-PC devices is via touch gestures. That is, users of post-PC tablets, smartphones, portable media/music players, bands, watches, and glasses control (or drive) their mobile post-PC devices primarily via touch gestures, and secondarily via other input mechanisms such as voice commands, head gestures, or keyboard strokes. The lower left quadrant shows that the primary input control paradigm for mobile PC devices is via a keyboard and a trackpad with the device resting on the user's lap. That is, users of PC netbooks, laptops, and Ultrabooks control (or drive) their mobile PC devices primarily via keyboard strokes and trackpad motions, and secondarily via other input mechanisms such as voice commands or touch gestures.

The lower right quadrant shows that the primary input control paradigm for non-mobile PC devices is via a mouse and keyboard with the device resting on the user's desktop. That is, users of PC consumer desktops, PC business desktops, and PC workstations control or drive their non-mobile PC devices primarily via mouse movements and keyboard strokes, and secondarily via other input mechanisms such as touch gestures or voice commands. The upper right quadrant shows that the primary input control paradigm for non-mobile post-PC devices is via the user's voice.

PC and Post-PC Complexity, Power, and Price Characteristics

The second variant of the strategic positioning framework represents the complexity, power, and price characteristics of devices from the PC era and the post-PC era, and it is presented below.

This diagram is referred to as the Multidimensional Characteristics Diagram for the Post-PC Era. The characteristics diagram contains four quadrants. Each quadrant provides an assessment, or rating, in graphical form of the core characteristics of the class of devices represented within the quadrant. The core characteristics are represented by the aforementioned dimensions of complexity, power consumption, and price.

The upper left quadrant shows that mobile post-PC devices are rated as very low in operational complexity, very low in power consumption, and very low in price. That is, post-PC tablets, smartphones, portable music/media players, bands, watches, and glasses are typically very simple, easy, and fun to use, very energy efficient with all-day battery life, and very affordable for the typical global consumer. The lower left quadrant shows that mobile PC devices are rated as high in operational complexity, moderate in power consumption, and moderate in price. That is, PC netbooks, laptops, and Ultrabooks are typically somewhat tricky to use for the average global consumer, moderately energy efficient with multi-hour battery life, and fairly affordable for the typical global consumer.

The lower right quadrant shows that non-mobile PC devices are rated as very high in operational complexity, high in power consumption, and high in price. That is, PC consumer desktops, business desktops, and workstations are typically difficult to use, not energy efficient, and fairly expensive for the typical global consumer. The upper right quadrant shows that non-mobile post-PC devices are rated as low in operational complexity, very high in power consumption, and very high in price. That is, post-PC smart televisions, high definition smart televisions, Ultra HD smart televisions, and extreme definition smart televisions are typically simple, easy, and fun to use, energy inefficient, and expensive for the typical global consumer.

Core Competencies of Post-PC Devices and PC Devices

The third variant of the strategic positioning framework helps answer two fundamental questions asked today by all global-scale PC and post-PC device designers and manufacturers:

 

  1. Does this device deserve to exist?
  2. Will it unquestionably improve the lives of its users?

 

It does so by defining the central purpose of the device in helping improve peoples' lives and spatially positions each device relative to all other devices to demonstrate its reason for existence, as presented below.

This diagram is referred to as the Multidimensional Device Competency Framework for the Post-PC Era. The competency framework contains four quadrants. Each quadrant depicts the central purpose, or more precisely the core competency, of each device contained within the quadrant.

Before we describe each device in each of the four quadrants of the competency framework, it is important to take a brief step into the world of competitive strategy. In this world, we typically assess a particular firm's ability to compete against other firms in its industry or line of business. We make our assessments based on the core competencies of the firm; that is, the unique set of skills and capabilities possessed by the firm (usually acquired over protracted periods of time) that fundamentally differentiate it from other firms within its domain and ultimately enable it to achieve a position of sustainable competitive advantage. Firms that achieve this unique and rare position are able to consistently deliver superior value, in the form of products or services, to customers and superior financial returns to shareholders.

We believe that the core competency concept which has been applied traditionally to the strategic analysis of businesses in the world of competitive strategy can be applied to a strategic analysis of game changing devices in the multi-screen world of the modern post-PC era. Given this background, we are now ready to describe the four quadrants of the competency diagram above.

The upper left quadrant shows that the core competency of a post-PC portable media player is the playing experience, the core competency of a post-PC smartphone is the communications experience, and the core competency of a post-PC tablet is the reading experience.
The lower left quadrant shows that core competency of a PC laptop is the working and managing experience. The fact that the core competency of the PC laptop includes managing is one of the principal reasons that mobile PC devices are inherently more complex than mobile post-PC devices.

The lower right quadrant shows that the core competency of a PC desktop is the creating and managing experience. The fact that the core competency of the PC desktop includes managing is one of the key reasons that non-mobile PC devices are fundamentally more complex than non-mobile post-PC devices. The upper right quadrant shows that the core competency of a post-PC smart television is the watching experience.

Arguments will certainly be made that jack-of-all-trades PCs do so much more than work, create, and manage. And while that is clearly and obviously true from a non-core competency viewpoint, the PC is no longer competing against itself. It must possess unique capabilities to differentiate itself relative to competing products and offer superior value to customers. In this new world, a world where devices are fundamentally differentiated based on their core competencies, the critical question for all global-scale PC device designers and PC device manufacturers to ask is the following:

 

  • Do personal computers play, communicate, read, and watch better than the competing devices presented in the multidimensional device competency framework?

 

The answer to that question is precisely why post-PC media players, post-PC smartphones, post-PC tablets, post-PC smart TVs, as well as future post-PC wearables, such as Internet watches and Internet glasses that are each highly optimized for their central purpose deserve to exist and will unquestionably improve the lives of people across the globe.

To summarize, the multidimensional strategic positioning framework for the post-PC era and its three variants, the multidimensional control diagram, the multidimensional characteristics diagram, and the multidimensional device competency framework collectively represent a fundamentally new visual approach for positioning, classifying, characterizing, and competitively analyzing all devices, whether new or old, small or large, portable or non-portable, simple or complex, smart or non-smart, affordable or expensive, power efficient or power hungry, touchable or non-touchable, and voice oriented or non-voice oriented. Moreover, this new visual framework allows us to definitively answer the fundamental question "What is a post-PC device?" posed previously using the visual and pictorial diagrams presented above in conjunction with the following concise written definition below.

Grand Unified Definition of a Post-PC Device

A post-PC device is formally defined herein as a wearable mobile, non-wearable mobile, or non-mobile product that satisfies the following four key conditions:

 

  1. Simple, easy, and fun to use.
  2. Controlled primarily via touch gestures or voice commands.
  3. Highly optimized around a central purpose, or core competency.
  4. Automated application and media content synchronization via the cloud.

 

Condition 1 maps to our discussion above regarding PC vs. post-PC complexity, and it is depicted and defined visually in the multidimensional characteristics diagram; condition 2 maps to our discussion above regarding PC vs. post-PC control paradigms, and it is depicted and defined visually in the multidimensional control diagram; condition 3 maps to our discussion above regarding PC vs. post-PC core competencies, and it is depicted and defined visually in the multidimensional device competency framework; and condition 4 maps to our prior discussion regarding the strategic and central role of the cloud in the post-PC era.

Of equal importance to the list of conditions above are the set of post-PC device properties that are purposefully not incorporated in the formal definition. Specifically, post-PC devices are not defined by size, as they can be very small in the case of wearables or very large in the case of smart UHD televisions; post-PC devices are not defined by power consumption, as they can be efficient in the case of smartphones or inefficient in the case of smart televisions; and post-PC devices are not defined by price, as they can be relatively inexpensive in the case of portable media players or relatively expensive in the case of smart XHD televisions.

Post-PC device qualities that are purposefully incorporated in the formal definition are low complexity, intuitive input control, highly optimized experience, and automated cloud synchronization. These qualities uniquely and collectively delineate the true essence of a post-PC device as summarized in the Post-PC Device Definition Diagram below, which brings together a grand unified view of our formal written definition of a post-PC device and our visual definition of a post-PC device.

The core post-PC device qualities highlighted in the grand unified post-PC definition diagram above work together synergistically and holistically to provide the user of a post-PC device with an overall experience that is more emotive, more intimate, and ultimately more joyful than a traditional PC experience. In the final analysis, the deep intangible feelings that resonate from the intersection of these defining and differentiating characteristics give a long-term sustainable competitive advantage to post-PC devices in an evermore likely post-PC world.

Vision for Post-PC Cloud-Connected Intelligent Eyewear


Over the past century, developed nations have moved from an industrial age into an information age. During this period, the nature of work has changed significantly, with the preponderance of new jobs shifting away from an old paradigm of linear manual work among members of a line to a new paradigm of non-linear knowledge work among members of a network.

Under the old paradigm, it was of paramount importance for skilled-trade workers to be able to see things very clearly in order to maximize the efficiency of the line. In contrast, under the new paradigm, it is of strategic importance for knowledge workers to be able to know and understand things very clearly in order to maximize the productivity of the network. Accordingly, we have begun to see a corresponding shift from the fundamental instrument enabling clear sight in the old world to an entirely new class of instruments enabling clear understanding in our new world.

Specifically, just as skilled workers and citizens of the industrial age were able to see things nearby with greater clarity using traditional eyewear, such as glasses and monocles, knowledge workers and everyday citizens of the information age are now, or soon will be, able to know and understand things nearby more clearly using knowledge, in many cases stored far away in the cloud, transmitted through modern intelligent eyewear, such as Google Glass, inocles, or Facebook Oculus Rift.

Given the central importance of this fundamental shift in eyewear, we have constructed the following visual summary diagram highlighting the key elements of the transition from traditional eyewear to modern intelligent eyewear.

The visual summary diagram above is referred to as The Transition from the Traditional Eyewear Era to the Intelligent Internet Eyewear Era Powered by the Cloud. It is organized in a square matrix with three columns and three rows. The middle column contains the following three core dimensions: eyewear examples, eyewear purpose, and eyewear clouds. The first and third columns display the specific values of the corresponding core dimension in the middle column for traditional eyewear and intelligent Internet eyewear, respectively, in text or graphical format.

Reading the summary diagram from left to right and top to bottom, the core dimensions and corresponding values for traditional eyewear and modern intelligent eyewear are:

 

  1. Traditional Eyewear Examples: Sun Glasses, Monocles, Reading Glasses
  2. Intelligent Eyewear Examples: Google Glass, Inocles, Facebook Oculus Rift
  3. Traditional Eyewear Purpose: To See Things More Clearly
  4. Intelligent Eyewear Purpose: To Know or Understand Things More Clearly
  5. Traditional Eyewear Clouds: Natural Clouds
  6. Intelligent Eyewear Clouds: Google Cloud, Facebook Cloud, Apple iCloud

 

Traditional eyewear, such as glasses and monocles which date back to the 13th century and 18th century respectively, provides users with the ability to see people, places, and things more clearly. In contrast, modern intelligent eyewear, such as Google Glass, inocles, and Oculus Rift, all 21st century inventions, provides users with the ability to understand people, places, and things more clearly.

The secret to the eventual success of this entirely new and, we strongly believe, hightly valuable class of cloud-connected post-PC devices lies in the cloud, which enables users of modern intelligent eyewear to instantly access information and knowledge about the people, places, and things that are immediately relevant to their current activity, location, and time period. In short, by continuously connecting to the cloud throughout their day and into the night, users can effortlessly tap the rich knowledge stores of the Internet at a moment’s notice without much more than a simple wink, glance, or voice gesture, expression, or command.